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Balance in the workplace   Giving bad news   Ideal leadership attributes   Culture clash   New boss   Rivalries   D. Beth Macy   Beth Macy   Macy Holdings   Dr. Beth Macy   Business consultant in The Woodlands   Business consulting in The Woodlands   Business management   Business leadership   Resolving organizational problems in business   Managers    SOS   Difficult people at work   The Houston Dialogue   Leaders    ThinkSpace   The personal side of leadership   Houston tele-dialogue   Organizational consulting   Organizational consulting     The Woodlands   Accelerating performance   Accelerating performance in business   Stress   Dealing with stress in business   Improving management skills   Improving leadership skills   High performance leadership   High performance leadership teams   Charting your career   The many faces of leadership   Theories of leadership   Corporate Attention Deficit Disorder   CADD   Highly effective leaders   Cross-boundary issues   Resistance to change   Lack of
Culture clash?
Lack of alignment?
Cross-boundary issues?
New boss?
Rivalries?
Resistance to change?
Post-Reorganization slump?

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Balance in the workplace   Giving bad news   Ideal leadership attributes   Culture clash   New boss   Rivalries   D. Beth Macy   Beth Macy   Macy Holdings   Dr. Beth Macy   Business consultant in The Woodlands   Business consulting in The Woodlands   Business management   Business leadership   Resolving organizational problems in business   Managers    SOS   Difficult people at work   The Houston Dialogue   Leaders    ThinkSpace   The personal side of leadership   Houston tele-dialogue   Organizational consulting   Organizational consulting     The Woodlands   Accelerating performance   Accelerating performance in business   Stress   Dealing with stress in business   Improving management skills   Improving leadership skills   High performance leadership   High performance leadership teams   Charting your career   The many faces of leadership   Theories of leadership   Corporate Attention Deficit Disorder   CADD   Highly effective leaders   Cross-boundary issues   Resistance to change   Lack of

Discovering the Patterns that Guide Our Lives

"...it's like finding the DNA of my personality
and what really runs me!"

Length: Six Tuesdays
Tuition: $135 ($125 Jung Center Members)
Dates: April 10 - May 15, 2012
Location: The Jung Center, 5200 Montrose Blvd, Houston, TX 77006-6597

Have you ever noticed how certain patterns seem to repeat in your experience over and over again?

  • Why do I attract this same circumstance (probably unwanted) over and over again?
  • How is it that I seem to attract the same kind of bosses, co-workers, employees or partners, even though their kind always irritates me after a while?
  • Why does my spouse (or friend or child) do the same (darn) thing over and over again that always gets my goat?
  • Why do we go to the same place on vacation every time, even though no one in our family especially enjoys it?
  • Why do I always order the same thing when I go out to eat?

And then, do you ask yourself how come?

Chances are, with a bit of searching, we all find these repetitions in our lives as well as the lives of those around us. These repetitions are actually patterns. Where do these patterns come from? How do they take up residence in our experience? Are we inviting them in, or do we just happen to be in their pathway? Are we stuck with them, or can we somehow get rid of them?

These are the kinds of questions we will explore in Discovering the Patterns that Guide Our Lives. We'll start with the idea of the pattern, what pioneering psychologist, Carl Jung, entitled archetypes. In his terminology, archetypes are "universal patterns or motifs which come from the collective unconsciousness, are the basic content of religions, mythologies, legends and fairy tales....On a personal level, archetypal motifs are patterns of thought or behavior that are common to humanity at all times and all places."

Archetypes, said Jung, have been with us since the beginning of time and exist at all levels, cosmic to cellular. They are fractal. While their form can change over long periods of time, their essence stays constant. For example, as far back as anthropologists and archeologists can reach, humankind seems to have had a belief in a power higher than themselves. At times this has been the belief in the mystery of life as worshipped from earliest times as the "Great Mother." At later times, the divine feminine was seen to divide into multiple forms in Greek mythology such as Artemis, Hestia, Hera, Aphrodite and others. And still later, many have worshipped the divine feminine as the Virgin Mary, the Black Madonna, Our Lady of Guadalupe, and others. Likewise, Zeus, highest of the Gods of Mt. Olympus, has been perceived in many forms over the millennia.

The examples above are just a few of many potential archetypal patterns which show their transformation over time while holding their core essence. But, there are many other archetypal patterns which permeate our lives and have been part of the experience of humankind from our inception. Here are some examples that most of us have felt in our lives, all of which have an archetypal pattern at their root:

  • Duty
  • Victimization
  • Self-sacrifice
  • Self identity
  • Rebelliousness
  • Exploration and curiosity
  • Leadership
  • Equity
  • Competition
  • Order
  • Rules and standards
  • Authority
  • Control
  • Crisis
  • Transition
  • Upheaval
  • Transformation
  • Regeneration

In each of our lives, we tend to be prone to some archetypal patterns more than to others. Each of us will be different in the set of patterns we attract. That set is largely what gives us our personality. Most people are unaware of the existence of the patterns. We say, "Oh, never mind, that's just how Joe is."

But if we do know about archetypal patterns and if we do recognize specifically which ones dominate in our personality, then we have a key with which to create more flexibility, more choice, more freedom for ourselves.

Do we ever truly rid ourselves of archetypal patterns? Probably not, because they are the building blocks of our personality and our social organization. But, we do have a lot of opportunity to work in harmony with them, to lessen how automatically they work through us, to choose to cultivate a working relationship with those that are aligned with our sense of purpose, and so to give us more freedom in our life choices and direction.

Using lecture, mythology, art and activities for self-reflection, the seminar will identify those archetypal patterns which seem to predominate in our individual experience, to find how these patterns play out in our day-to-day life, to explore how our individual patterns provide us with benefits and drawbacks, and to look for ways in which we can use our archetypal patterns to forward us on our life journeys.

How to Register

Register through the Jung Center either online by visiting the Jung Center website: www.junghouston.org or by calling the Center at 713-524-8253.


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